Persische Rennmäuse - Laberthread

    Diese Seite verwendet Cookies. Durch die Nutzung unserer Seite erklärst du dich damit einverstanden, dass wir Cookies setzen. Weitere Informationen

    • Neu

      Hello again - just wondering if there have ever been done any intelligence testing with Persians - as I am going to start looking into it to see if I can find out some home tests for them.

      I saw my girl doing something I thought was super smart - but not sure how to tell 'smart' from normal behaviour expressed differently. Anyone else's persians ever done anything really clever and thoughtful?

      Thanks in advance...

    • Neu

      Jaffar, Persians are truly smart. And they have incredible memories. Take a dog or cat toy with treats - once they figure it out, you can give it to them years later and they remember right away. I'll never forget my three original lady Persians, I left the cage door open one evening and they escaped. After that they checked the terrarium door several times a day for the rest of their life!

      I personally think that their single mindedness in schlepping food into their bunker (at least the females) enables them to spend alot of time chilling out - you know what I mean, they crouch and stare for hours :). Mongolians are always on the run and busy when awake, almost driven. So I think Persians longetivity might be due also to the rest periods :) and the effective way they ensure food stores, which lets certain members (like the males) to hang out and be lazy, waiting for females to come into heat :)

      My two Persian girls recently had access to the other male/female couples food bunker and spent 8 hours nonstop emptying it! They can perservere when they want to.

      Persians also seem so...stoic...at least compared to Mongolians...the bunker was emptied out? Uh huh, let's just start filling it up again. Put in a sandbath from another group? Sniff, sniff - aw, it's mine. They rarely react strongly, except if you are trying to combine them with another Persian and they can't stand each other.

      They seldom do stereotypical stuff that they don't have to do (like pawing in a glass corner or chewing up endless toilet paper rolls). Much better to sneakily chew your way out of a cage (2cm thick!) in a hidden place and wait around staring at the holder, hoping for a treat.

      A Persian (male or female) stops hoarding food when kept alone, no need because...no clan to feed? No competion?

      They do like to run on the running plate, less often the wheel...but like I say, they all tend to sit there and stare at me and chill alot!

      And I find they age similar to humans, quite active up to 4 years, then lazier and sleepier, then they get arthritis and incontinence and can't jump and balance well anymore, a fairly slow and steady decline. Mongolians are pretty good up to 2,5 or 3 years, then their age and behavior takes a sharp downward turn, fast.


      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      I saw my girl doing something I thought was super smart
      What did she do?
      "It's a strange and beautiful world" :rolleyes:
    • Neu

      Thanks for that answer - very useful. I do currently have that single female and he hasn't bunkered at all. Now I know it is normal.

      What she did was look like she decided on how to solve a physical puzzle in an instant. Whether she solved it there and then or remembered solving something similar from a long time ago I don't know.

      Anyway, she was faced with an issue, thought for a second (rather than keep trying) then went straight to the solution. It wasn't a set puzzle as such, just a set of circumstances. It all started when I passed her a slice of loofah from her top perch.

      She had a platform up top, which drops down and across a bit to the next platform - but which has a thick cotton bendy perch in the way of the leap. Easy to jump when it is just you and maybe some seeds in your mouth. Anyway, I gave her a giant slice of loofah while she was begging at me on her top shelf. She grabbed in her mouth from the top (so the slice hung down under her chin). She then tried to hop down into the other shelf. However, she couldn't hop down because the loofah was hitting the rope.

      She very quickly laid the loofah down on the shelf she was on, hanging over the edge slightly, hopped over the rope into the shelf below and immediately span around, reached up and retrieved the loofah and was on her way. I was gobsmacked.

      Whether it was 'thought' happening right there - or the memory of that exact circumstance being remembered - it was instantaneous - and exact.

      I am still wondering whether that was intelligence - like she solved that puzzle at some point (and possibly remembered it too). Because normal gerbils and other rodents tend to just battle away, smashing whatever they are holding against everything without letting go of it and either dragging it in behind them through brute force or ramming it in. Or just giving up.

      What are your thoughts on that?

      Also, a day later, my three youngsters ate our of an old enclosure (while I was waiting for a new enclosure to arrive) - chewed out and escaped. I blocked it up and put them back in. But overnight they escaped again earlier on. Anyway, at some point in the night they must have got worn out and couldn't get back in the enclosure so they climbed all the shelves and stole all the cardboard from various things, pulled it all down to a corner of the room and chewed it up into a giant new nest - must be nearly a foot across and at least 8 inches wide. How did they decide to do that - who gave the 'command' to go forage - but I totally love their laid back attitude and preparedness.

      They got out again last night, and just slept in the same nest again - but made it a bit bigger. They didn't even get up when I went in this morning, just watched me for a bit and went back to sleep...

      The new cage arrived yesterday - all cleaned and set up for today - so hopefully they won't mind sleeping in their own cage tonight!!!

    • Neu

      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      She had a platform up top, which drops down and across a bit to the next platform - but which has a thick cotton bendy perch in the way of the leap. Easy to jump when it is just you and maybe some seeds in your mouth. Anyway, I gave her a giant slice of loofah while she was begging at me on her top shelf. She grabbed in her mouth from the top (so the slice hung down under her chin). She then tried to hop down into the other shelf. However, she couldn't hop down because the loofah was hitting the rope.

      She very quickly laid the loofah down on the shelf she was on, hanging over the edge slightly, hopped over the rope into the shelf below and immediately span around, reached up and retrieved the loofah and was on her way. I was gobsmacked.
      Jaffar, what a wonderful story!

      Definitely intelligence, and on purpose I believe.

      I give my Persians lots of Pasta Noodles (uncooked), so that they have alot of big stuff to schlepp. They don't really eat them. They discovered it was alot less transport work to drop the noodles in the gap of the stairway platforms, where the noodles fell about a meter - the Persians scampered down unimpeded to pick up the noodles (or there was a sister/aunt to take over) and bring it the remaining 40cm distance to the bunker). The clacking of the falling noodles was wonderful :)


      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      Also, a day later, my three youngsters ate our of an old enclosure (while I was waiting for a new enclosure to arrive) - chewed out and escaped. I blocked it up and put them back in. But overnight they escaped again earlier on. Anyway, at some point in the night they must have got worn out and couldn't get back in the enclosure so they climbed all the shelves and stole all the cardboard from various things, pulled it all down to a corner of the room and chewed it up into a giant new nest - must be nearly a foot across and at least 8 inches wide. How did they decide to do that - who gave the 'command' to go forage - but I totally love their laid back attitude and preparedness.

      They got out again last night, and just slept in the same nest again - but made it a bit bigger. They didn't even get up when I went in this morning, just watched me for a bit and went back to sleep...
      Ha, heehee great ! Reminds me of my own "the great Perser escape", where 7 Persians escaped and proceeded to make a nest of my vacuum cleaner bags, chewed off the tops of the treat tins, and schlepped all of my decorative walnuts into a decommissioned bunker under the stairs.

      Here a longish video of their sojourn:


      @Jaffar&Friends
      What is your experience to date keeping male groups? Mine (father and two sons) broke up, as did my previous male groups. Thus I tend to recommend holding males in pairs, not more.
      "It's a strange and beautiful world" :rolleyes:
    • Neu

      Ahh, this is my 2:1 trio I was considering splitting up (see other thread) so it is two young men and a lady (all over a year old now. I haven't had enough of them yet to have had a male trio myself.

      Love your escape story - and how large was their play zone - at least mine only got out in a small secure room - they could only really chew up the door, walls and all that cardboard - I can't imagine them chewing up my folders, furniture and whatever else they fancied! I think you got off quite lightly! Love the vacuum bags though - so funny.

      I am very impressed by the pasta dropping trick - that really was a smart move. How do they know that the second step will be carried out by someone else? Or maybe they knew they could go get it themselves anyway. Very intelligent either way. I just love the idea of this now. I mean I knew they weren't as gormless as my duprasi - but this is a whole other level. Thanks for sharing this - I will watch tem even more now...

    • Neu

      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      Ahh, this is my 2:1 trio I was considering splitting up (see other thread)
      Oh! I think I missed this one? There are relatively few Persian posts, so we normally write everything in this general thread. Problem is that otherwise if you don't perchance look at the right time, the thread is sort of "gone" really fast, supplanted from following posts. Can you link it for me?


      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      Love your escape story - and how large was their play zone
      Hah! About 80m2 ;D
      But it wasn't really thaaat hard to catch them , Persians are not sneaky...I just sat watching TV and one after another they ambled across the room and my field of vision, of course I had to perfect the Persian "dive", they had little desire to return to their smallish cage :D


      Jaffar&Friends schrieb:

      I am very impressed by the pasta dropping trick - that really was a smart move. How do they know that the second step will be carried out by someone else? Or maybe they knew they could go get it themselves anyway.
      They didn't, and sometimes there was no aunt/sister below. They dropped the Pasta, ran down, when somebody else was there, they leapt up to continue gathering pasta, otherwise fetched dropped Pasta and brought to bunker.

      Soooo smart, it's almost hard to keep abreast and to challenge them. Try to think of lots of things, but they are so smart, they quickly figure out - hey, worth it...or sometimes not. I remember I strew tiny seeds (Chia and linseeds and puffed amaranth and poppy seeds etc.), and they ended up deciding it wasn't worth it to vacuum them up. I think there just wasn't that much nutrition to advocate gathering them! 8o Sesame seeds widely distributed they like and search for. A bit bigger but also popular are Coconut shreds, Hanfsamen (marijuana seeds???) and Buchweizen.
      "It's a strange and beautiful world" :rolleyes: